March 7 & 8, 2019 - KIKIWAK INN, OPASKWAYAK CREE NATION

The 3rd Annual TRC Education for Reconciliation Conference, hosted by the University College of the North (UCN), will discuss and build student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect. Conversations will work to identify teacher-training needs and how to utilize Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods in classrooms.

The foundation of every community is the education of its youth. With this focus, over the two-days the Education and Reconciliation will have a strong emphasis on youth and the hope and optimism for the next generation, by building relationships between Indigenous communities and education institutions.

 

 

Program

Day 1 – Thursday, March 7th

7:30 AM

Pipe Ceremony

8:00 – 8:45 AM

Registration & Breakfast

8:45 – 9:30 AM

Opening Prayer – Elder Martha Jonasson
Co-Chair – Doris Young and Donna Carriere
Welcoming Remarks – Charlene Lafreniere & Edwin Jebb and Dignitaries

9:30 – 10:30AM

Keynote Address
Senator Yvonne Boyer

10:30 – 10:45AM

Health Break

10:45 – 11:45AM

Province of Manitoba Update
Helen Robinson Settee, Director, Indigenous Inclusion Directorate

11:45 – 12:45PM

Lunch

12:45 – 2:00PM

Ron Cook

2:00 – 2:15PM

Health Break

2:15 – 3:30PM

Sports & Reconciliation School Panel
Panelists: Dan Highway, Philip Michel

5:30 – 9:00PM

Dinner & Keynote Address
Max FineDay, Executive Director, Canadian Roots Exchange

Day 2 – Friday, March 8th

8:00 – 9:00AM

Hot Breakfast

9:00 – 9:15AM

Recap of Day One
Overview of Day Two

9:15 – 10:15AM

Sam McKegney, Associate Professor, Queen’s University

10:15 – 10:30AM

Health Break

10:30 – 11:15PM

The Effects of Hydro to Peoples and Communities in the North
Ramona Neckoway

11:15AM – 12:00PM

Roundtable Discussions

12:00 – 1:00PM

Lunch

1:00 – 2:15PM

Closing Address
Phil Fontaine
Former National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations

2:15 – 2:45PM

Closing Song – Joe A Ross School
Closing Prayer – Elder Martha Jonasson

Speakers

Max FineDay

Max FineDay

Executive Director of Canadian Roots Exchange

Biography

Max FineDay is a nêhiyaw napew from the Sweetgrass First Nation in Saskatchewan, Treaty 6 Territory. He is currently serving as Executive Director of Canadian Roots Exchange, a recognized leader in delivering reconciliation programming to Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth across the country.

Extended Biography

In his spare time Max can be found serving as an advisor to the President of the Economic Club of Canada, the Laidlaw Foundation and laughing at his own jokes. He serves on the interim National Council on Reconciliation & is based in Toronto. Max can be found on twitter, @MaxFineDay
Sam KcKegney

Sam KcKegney

Associate Professor, Queen's University

Biography

Sam McKegney is a settler scholar of Indigenous literatures and an Associate Professor at Queen’s University in the territory of the Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe Peoples.

Extended Biography

He has published a collection of interviews entitled Masculindians: Conversations about Indigenous Manhood (2014), a monograph entitled Magic Weapons: Aboriginal Writers Remaking Community after Residential School (2007), and articles on such topics as environmental kinship, masculinity theory, prison writing, decolonial activism, and Canadian hockey mythologies.

Senator Yvonne Boyer

Senator Yvonne Boyer

Biography

Senator Yvonne Boyer is a member of the Métis Nation of Ontario with her ancestral roots in the Métis Nation-Saskatchewan and the Red River.

Extended Biography

With a background in nursing, including in the operating room, she has over 21 years of experience practicing law and publishing extensively on the topics of Indigenous health and how Aboriginal rights and treaty law intersects on the health of First Nations, Metis and Inuit people. She is a member of the Law Society of Ontario and the Law Society of Saskatchewan and received her Bachelor of Laws from the University of Saskatchewan, and her Master of Laws and Doctor of Laws from the University of Ottawa. In 2013, she completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship with the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre at the University of Regina. She is a former Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Health and Wellness at Brandon University.

In addition to running her own law practice, she came to the Senate of Canada from the University of Ottawa, where she was the Associate Director for the Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics and a part time professor in the Faculty of Law. She worked previously as counsel to the Native Women’s Association of Canada, legal advisor to the Canadian Nurses Protective Society, and an executive with the Aboriginal Healing Foundation and the National Aboriginal Health Organization.

Helen Settee

Helen Settee

Director of the Indigenous Inclusion Directorate

Biography

Helen Settee has been working with the Department of Education and Training since 1995. Some of her work includes representing Manitoba on the Council of Ministers Education Canada on the Indigenous Education Committee, Partner Lead with the Manitoba Aboriginal Languages Strategy and Steering Committee member for the Treaty Education Initiative to name a few. She also participates on community based committees In Winnipeg such as Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc. Council and Indigenous Learning Circle.

Extended Biography

Previous to her work as Director, she was an education consultant and a teacher in Winnipeg School Division, which included teaching at the two Aboriginal inner-city schools – Children of the Earth and Niji Mahkwa.  She was born and raised in the inner city of Winnipeg and always wanted to come back to teach in the schools where she was a student. She was convinced that with the racism she felt as a student in her adolescent years, in her adult years she had to somewhat influence change by being a role model and to be a change agent. 

Aside from being an educator, she is also the mother of two adult sons, Craig and Kevin and a grandmother to Ogimaabinens.

Sam KcKegney

Sam KcKegney

Associate Professor, Queen's University

Biography

Dr. Ramona Neckoway is an Assistant Professor at University College of the North (Thompson Campus) and currently serves as the Chair of its Aboriginal Northern Studies Program. She is a co-investigator on a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Partnership Grant, Wa Ni Ska Tan: A Cross-Regional Research Alliance focused on the Implications of Hydropower for Environments & Indigenous Communities in Canada and Beyond.

Extended Biography

For more than a decade, Ramona has listened to and learned about local perspectives and histories as they relate to implications of hydropower and as a member of a Hydro-affected community in northern Manitoba (Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation), her research is shaped by the experiences and encounters of her family and her community.

Dr. Neckoway is also co-lead on a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) funded project designed to offer opportunities for Indigenous youth to learn about the natural sciences in culturally relevant and meaningful ways. Shaped by both Indigenous customs and practices and Western scientific traditions, this cross-cultural and interdisciplinary initiative locates science education through land-based learning opportunities grounded in, and that draw from, culturally rich Indigenous worldviews.

Philip Michel

Philip Michel

Biography

Philip Michel was born and raised in Brochet, Manitoba on the Barren Lands First Nation. Philip now resides in Thompson, Manitoba. He is married with a blended family of six children, twenty grandchildren and six great grandchildren.

Extended Biography

He attended the Guy Hill Residential School on Clearwater Lake for seven years, and Assiniboia High School in Winnipeg for two years. Philip has been sober and on a healing journey for over thirty years. Philip has worked mostly in the native field for various organizations including seven years as Chief of his First Nation. Philip has worked on the various phases of the residential school issue for the past eighteen years. Philip is now retired and is a recognized Elder in Native Spirituality.

Phil Fontaine

Phil Fontaine

Former National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations

Biography

Bold, tenacious, solution-oriented and forward-looking, Phil Fontaine is an articulate advocate for the future of Canada and for our indigenous peoples. As the former three-term National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, he is a shining example of how strong leadership can work. 

Extended Biography

Fontaine, the youngest son in an Ojibway family of 12 children, has been instrumental in facilitating change and advancement for First Nations people from the time he was first elected to public office as chief, when he was only 28 years old. Today, First Nations people are now the fastest growing demographic segment in Canada. An advocate for human rights, and a survivor of residential school abuse, Fontaine’s crowning achievement to date is the residential schools settlement. At $5.6billion in individual compensation, Fontaine negotiated the largest settlement in Canadian history – for the largest human rights violation in Canadian history – arising out of the 150-year Indian residential school tragedy.
Phil Fontaine is a charismatic speaker who has dedicated most of his life to the advancement of First Nations people. Respected at home and abroad, Fontaine attended President Obama’s inauguration, met with Pope Benedict XVI to gain an apology for his people, and raised the Corporate Challenge to Canadian organizations. Corporations, governments and associations seeking leadership advice will benefit from Fontaine’s extraordinary ability to speak from the heart and teach others how to achieve results.

Ron Cook

Ron Cook

Biography

Ron Cook was a fisherman on Lake Winnipeg for 15 years and lived a traditional lifestyle with his wife and five daughters. In 1992, his interest in his first language (nehinawewin) inspired him to enter BUNTEP when they offered a program for training Native Language teachers, graduating in 1997 with greatest distinction.

Extended Biography

He taught Cree at Grand Rapids School for five years before he moved to Thompson to teach at Wapanohk Community School in the Cree bilingual program. He was the Cree Language/Indigenous Perspectives Coordinator for the School District of Mystery Lake from September 2006 until he retired in June 2018. He is currently the curriculum consultant for the Centre for Aboriginal Language and Culture at the University College of the North.

Mr. Edwin Jebb

Mr. Edwin Jebb

Chancellor

Biography

A member of the Opaskwayak Cree Nation (OCN), Edwin Jebb was one of the first Aboriginal graduates of the University of Manitoba.  Edwin is retired from the Opaskwayak Education Authority where he spent 19 years heading OCN’s school system, developing education programs and promoting healthy lifestyles for Manitoba’s First Nations people.

Extended Biography

An active volunteer in his community, Edwin was a member of the implementation team tasked with developing the University College of the North.  Edwin has received numerous awards throughout his career including the Brandon University’s Teacher Education Program Meritorious Service Award, the Frontier School Division Award and was named to the Order of Manitoba in 2000. Edwin was installed as the University College of the North’s second Chancellor in June 2011.

Daniel Highway

Daniel Highway

Biography

Daniel was born in Northern Manitoba, somewhere in the trapline north of Brochet and attended residential school in The Pas and Clearwater Lake (1955-1966). He went to high school in Winnipeg at Assiniboia Residential School (1966-1969) for one year before transferring to St. Boniface High School. He started working in construction and mining, then for the Manitoba Government for 27 years in Northern Affairs and the Highways Department, Human Resources until he retired in 2005.

Extended Biography

Daniel volunteered in the community sitting on numerous boards (12) and many committees for Aboriginal people and youth. He was awarded with The Bill Hanson and IANE Award for his work in promoting native employment in Canada and the Province of Manitoba and the DFan Highway Equity and Diversity Award for his work in promoting native employment in the provincial government.
Daniel won the Theres Grasgrain Award as Canadian Male Volunteer of the Year for his volunteer work in the coomumity. He also does the “Walk a Mile in my Mocassins” one-day workshop on cultural awareness and worked for SNC. He worked for Lavalin Construction Company as an Aboriginal Laison for Native Communitites on contract, and now works for residential school survivors by providing resources for “Spiritual Healing and Cultural Renewal”.

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